It’s all just a Story~ a traveling art show

So I was invited along with a plethora of amazing artists to create a 24″x30″ painting for an art show that sprinkles a bit of magic over some really great stories, to bring them to life once more, in art form. As I dropped my art off at the Oak Lawn Branch of the Dallas library system, I got to meet (for the second time) the mastermind behind the curtain and artist extraordinaire, Robb Conover. His eyes sparkled as he relayed his vision and how it was coming into being. There are so many people who are excited too, including KERA, the Dallas Morning News, the Dallas Library and a few other media outlets. They should be too, the array of artists and books chosen are both fascinating and truly creative works.

The paintings are going to be part of a year long tour for the Dallas library. They will be going to all the branches for month long stints, including the opening of the newest library at White Rock Lake, next month. This is a truly splendid experience for both the artists and the patrons to the library as it brings a great amount of exposure to the arts and reading.

There is going to be an artists reception on March 8 from 6-7:30 at 4100 Cedar Springs Road, Dallas Tx. 75219. 214-670-1359. There will be wine and hors d’oevre.

For the kids, there will be a FREE fun day of events including face painting, games, story telling and general rebel-rousing! It will be next Saturday, March 10th from Noon to 3. The artists are being asked to dress up as storybook characters, so you know it will be a visual smorgasbord! Refreshments and giveaways will be provided.

The Oak Lawn Library is at 4100 Cedar Springs at the corner of Cedar Springs and Knight. For more information, contact Ray Sablack or Barbara Carr at (214) 670-1359

Here is a sneak peek, but not everything is here, and it’s so much better to see it all in person. Hope to see you there!

Participating artists:

Adnan Razvi_________________Pinocchio
Frank Tringali_______________The Emperors New Clothes
Hati Chivaviro Munetsi________Green Eggs And Ham
Christian Millet______________Hansel & Gretel
Margo Miller________________Rapunzel
Kerian Massey_____________The Bremen Town Musicians
Andy Morris_______________Jack And The Beanstalk
Gina Marie Dunn___________The Secret Garden
Essie Graham_____________The Steadfast Tin Soldier
Cathryn Colcer____________ Rumpelstiltskin
Andrea Davis______________Cinderella
Kevin Obregon_____________The little old woman that lived in a shoe.
David Rodriguez____________The three little pigs.
Liz London_________________Sleeping Beauty
Jack Sheely________________Little Red Riding Hood
Dan Colcer______________ The elves and the shoemaker
Iris Candelaria___________The last Unicorn
Chad Evans______________The Frog Prince
Melissa Wertz____________The Princess and the Pea.
Brad Albright_____________Alice in Wonderland.
Jacque Allen Forsher_______Goldilocks and the Three Bears.
Zachary Morriss___________Belling The Cat.
Cori Berg________________The Ugly Duckling
Cigi Cowgoddess_________ Beauty and The Beast
Jacqueline Marchioni______Puss-n-Boots
Robb Conover____________The Little Mermaid
Rachel White Delgado________The Little Prince..
Kailyn Kerlee Cano___________ The Three Billy Goats Gruff

Being Quirky SNL skit with Zooey Deschanel

I have found one of my newest most favorite SNL skits. Nothin says “cool” like “Bein Quirky!” I especially LURRRRVE Bjorks sweater!

 

Shoe Junkies UNITE!

Ok, so if you know anything about me, you know I LURRRRRVVE shoes! I paint them, I wear them, I admire the costly “can’t-haves-quite-yet” and the “oh-don’t-even -bother-dreaming -about-them” pedi pedestals we call shoes. Heels, preferably for me. So I was gobstruck when I came onto a website devoted wholeheartedly to some of the most amazing, outlandish, garrish and even some incredibly impossible shoes. I could spend and admit, have spent hours drooling and giggling over the array that they have listed.

The purveyors are Liza Snook and Taco Zwaanswijk, whom reside in Holland. Two shoe junkies on a mission to pluck the most obscure to the most sensual shoe you will ever find, all on one site. So fill your shoe fetish at The Virtual Shoe Museum.

Here are a few samples to tide you over before you jump to thier page.

El Corazon 2012

The opening to El Corazon is tomorrow night in Dallas. I am thrilled to be part of such a wonderfully curated show! The talent and imagination is immense. I feel so honoured to be a part of something so well put together. Here is the invite with list of Artists. I took a few parting shots as I dropped off my artwork. I cannot wait to see it all put together Last year it was magnificent!

Show Runs from Feb 4-March 3

Opening Reception Saturday February 4th, 7-9pm

The artists featured in the exhibition are:
ARTners Group, Kerian Babbitt-Massey, Awadh Baryoum, Carley Blackman,
Angie Bolling, Eunice Bridges, Debbie Buie, Rebecca Collins, Liz Conrad, Ray-Mel
Cornelius, Patricia Curry, Katrina Doran, Lori Dudley, Gina Marie Dunn, Brett
Dyer, Jacque Forsher, Tyra Goodley, Cindy Gray, Rebecca Guy, Kimberly Harris,
Hayden Harris, Anna Hernandez, Lizzett Herrera, Antoaneta Hillman, Suzan
Kumar, Katrine Kyhnel, Joanna LaGrone-Headrick, Rachel E. Lord, Eli Lorenz,
Roberta Masciarelli, Julia McLain, Julie Mortillaro, Teri Muse, Lauri Osburn
Thomas, Becky Phillips, Evy Pitcher, Adam Ramirez, Marty Ray, Richard Ray,
Alfredo Rodriguez, Lesley Rucker, Lowell Sargeant, Kate Schatz, Armando
Sebastian, Heather Shoulders, Pam Stern, Linda Stokes, Diane Torres, Juan Torres-
Zavala, Melissa Jane Wertz and David Zarazúa II.

 

LOCATION AND HOURS:
The Bath House Cultural Center is located on the eastern shore of White Rock Lake at
the end of Northcliff Dr. off of Buckner Blvd. at 521 E. Lawther, Dallas, TX 75218.
Hours of operation are Tuesday-Saturday, 12:00 noon to 6:00 PM. The center is open
until 10:00 PM on nights with theatre performances. For general information about
cultural programs at the Bath House Cultural Center, please call (214) 670-8749 or visit
the center’s website at www.bathhousecultural.com

Eat, Paint and Wine…it’s all about a good time!

I’m starting a new adventure and it includes you! Well, if you want to anyway!

This weekend will be my first class in teaching people how to paint. We will be starting off with Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.”

Eat, Paint, and WineIt will be held in the Flying Fish Gallery, but I am planning more classes in the immediate future. My class filled up in less than a few days. I am planning a nice little menu of Hors D’ouvres. Not to be missed! Not to mention my super snarky wit and humor…ok well, the dip is good.

Here is a list of what will be served, so please pair your wine accordingly.

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Sat, June 4th Apps Menu

cabbage wrapped shrimp with a mango pineapple chutney
tomato and mozzarella cheese salad with fresh basil
fresh veggies from the garden with a fresh dill dip
assorted olives  and olives stuffed with blue cheese and a blue cheese crumble with crackers
assorted cheese tray with grapes

Passionfruit Punch with a mint and lemon garnis

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You may have missed this class, but please check my web page for more available dates.
I will be adding more shortly!

Thinking outside the Bento Box

I found an array of really cool Bento Boxes some creative parents and chef’s have created. I think their purpose is to entice picky eaters that a carrot shaped like hello kitty, tastes soooo much better. I have to agree. I’m smitten with the starbucks Bento. Makes me want a Frappamochadeliciousness.

Etch a Sketch Masterpieces

You’ve seen them sitting on your niece’s floor or perhaps you owned one when you were a kid. Etch-A-Sketchs® are fun yet somewhat difficult to master. One wrong turn of the knob and your masterpiece looks like it grew Pinnoccio’s nose.
Today I was talking to a friend and we were discussing some of the stranger art forms and she alighted me to a fact that there are actual Etch-A-Sketch® masters out there. I had to see for myself.
Here’s what I found….
http://www.etch-a-sketchartist.com/
The Etch-A-Sketch® Art of Jeff Gagliardi

Etch-A-Sketch Artist, Jeff Gagliardi
With almost 35 years experience in Etch-A-Sketch Art, Jeff Gagliardi is known as one of the original, and still one of the best, Etch-A-Sketch artists.

etch a sketch artetch a sketch artetch a sketch art

George Vlosich III

Etch-A-Sketch Artist, George Vlosich III

Since 1989 – at just ten years of age – George Vlosich III has been perfecting his talent on the Etch A Sketch. Each is an original work of art that takes 70-80 hours to create. Once finished, the piece is then preserved to stand the test of time. Every creation is uniquely different, and cannot be duplicated. They are featured in galleries throughout the world and have sold for more than $10,000. George has Etched many of the world’s greatest athletes and celebrities and his work has been described as “the one continuous line that continues to amaze the world.” George is proud to have paved the way for others to follow in his footsteps, but what continues to set George apart is his amazing story, his incredibly detailed etches, his worldwide publicity and his uncompromising passion to take his Etches to places no one ever thought possible.

For inquiries on events and original artwork contact GV Art + Design at: contact@gvartwork.com

etch a sketch artetch a sketch artetch a sketch art

The shoe making genius of Anastasia Radevich

As an artist who gets anxious and excited every time I start a new shoe painting, I got even more spastic when I discovered the art…eh shoe making genius of Anastasia Radevich. Her shoes are like flashes of the future and the organically inspired. I want to swim in her brain for a bit to see where she is coming from. The next best thing though, is the sneak peek of her sketch book on her website. I ate that up like a thanksgiving feast. It had elements of earth and whimsy and grit and softness. It was akin to watching a ballerina or ice skater. You see their strength and tenacity, yet they are so delicate looking and refined. I just hope that my art shoes can one day inspire someone else like her shoes do to me.

 

Hey Ms. Anastasia Radevich, if you are reading this, I’ll trade you a painting any day for a pair of your awesome shoes!

Sponsored by Foundation de la Mode de Montréal, Anastasia has completed a diploma with distinction at London College of Fashion, home to names like Jimmy Choo, Patrick Cox and Georgina Goodman. Anastasia is a Canadian footwear designer of Belarusian origin. She lives and works on both continents.

Visit her website to experience all of her shoes and genius!

Scott Weaver’s enigmatic toothpick city

Perhaps you cannot see your next art piece beyond the trees or you feel you’ve lost your way. Take a look at someone who has not only found his path but built it to suit his fancy. I just discovered an artist who has like many great artists before him, devoted a lifetime to one piece of art.  Scott Weaver has spent the last 35 years fabricating a whimsical rendition of the city of San Francisco made entirely of toothpicks! Not only is it an incredible ping-pong ball run with several seperate runs, giving tours of certain parts of the city, it also is a homage to the history and heart of San Fransisco.

So the next time you pick up a toothpick to scrape that broccoli out of your tooth, just imagine what else could be done with it!

Scott Weaver’s intricate San Fran artwork will be on display in the Tinkering Studio until June 19th, 2011.

He is currently showing at the Tinkering Studio inside the Exploratorium at the Palace of Fine Arts, 3601 Lyon Street, San Francisco, CA.

How to write an Artist Statement that says something!

Creature comfort- painting By Kerian MasseyCreature Comfort

Here is great advice on writing your artists statement by Molly Gordon. It helped me immensely in creating my own statement. The one I had pretty much said, “I draw, I paint, take from it what you will…” yeah I know, inspiring huh?

Please visit her website to learn more about Molly.

How to Write an Artist’s Statement with Creativity and Integrity

By Molly Gordon

Your artist’s statement can be a moving testament to your creativity and integrity. The expression of this commitment will vary, but the effectiveness of your artist’s statement stems from the authority with which you write it.

Think of your artist’s statement as a nourishing stew. The rich flavors and inviting aroma will feed your spirit and summon wonderful people to your table. You’ll want to make sure your stew is made from the freshest, finest ingredients and that it has been simmered and seasoned with care. Do this, and you will be proud to share your creative vision — your authority — with others.
Writing Your Artist’s Statement

Step One: Assemble the Ingredients.

1. Take five minutes and think about why you do what you do. How did you get into this work? How do you feel when work is going well? What are your favorite things about your work? Jot down short phrases that capture your thoughts. Don’t worry about making sense or connections. The more you stir up at this point, the richer the stew.

2. Make a list of words and phrases that communicate your feelings about your work and your values. Include words you like, words that make you feel good, words that communicate your values or fascinations. Be loose. Be happy. Be real. Think of these as potential seasonings for your stew. You don’t have to choose which ones to use just yet, so get them all out of the cupboard.

3. Answer these questions as simply as you can. Your answers are the meat and potatoes of your stew. Let them be raw and uncut for now.

* What is your favorite tool? Why?
* What is your favorite material? Why?
* What do you like best about what you do?
* What do you mean when you say that a piece has turned out really well?
* What patterns emerge in your work? Is there a pattern in the way you select materials? In the way you use color, texture or light?
* What do you do differently from the way you were taught? Why?
* What is your favorite color? List three qualities of the color. Consider that these qualities apply to your work.

4. Look at your word list. Add new words suggested by your answers to the questions above.

5. Choose two key words from your word list. They can be related or entirely different. Look them up in a dictionary. Read all the definitions listed for your words. Copy the definitions, thinking about what notions they have in common. Look your words up in a Thesaurus. Read the entries related to your words. Are there any new words that should be added to your word list?

6. Write five sentences that tell the truth about your connection to your work. If you are stuck, start by filling in the blanks below.

When I work with __________ I am reminded that ___________.

I begin a piece by ______________.

I know a piece is done when __________________.

When my work is going well, I am filled with a sense of _____________.

When people see my work, I’d like them to ________________.

Step Two: Filling the Pot.

Write a three paragraph artist’s statement. Keep your sentences authentic and direct. Use the present tense (“I am,” not “I was,” “I do,” not “I did.”) Be brave: say nice things about yourself. If you find that you falter, write three paragraphs about an artist whose work you admire. Then write about yourself as though you were an admiring colleague. As a rule, your artist’s statement should be written in the first person. Refer to yourself with the pronouns “I, me, my.” If this blocks you, write in the third person, then go back and change the pronouns as needed when you get to Step Four. Use the suggestions below to structure your statement. Write three to five sentences per paragraph.

First paragraph. Begin with a simple statement of why you do the work you do. Support that statement, telling the reader more about your goals and aspirations.

Second paragraph. Tell the reader how you make decisions in the course of your work. How and why do you select materials, techniques, themes? Keep it simple and tell the truth.

Third paragraph. Tell the reader a little more about your current work. How it is grew out of prior work or life experiences. What are you exploring, attempting, challenging by doing this work.

Step Three: Simmering the Stew.

Your artist’s statement is a piece of very personal writing. Let it simmer overnight before your reread it. This incubation period will help give you the detachment necessary to polish the writing without violating your sense of integrity and safety. While your statement simmers, let your mind wander over the ingredients you assembled in Step One. Allow yourself to experience the truth of your creative experience. Marvel at the wealth of seasonings and abundance of vegetables you have at your disposal. Enjoy the realization that your work is grounded in real values and experience. If you think of things you might have left out of your statement, jot them down, but leave the statement alone.

Step Four: Taste and Correct the Seasonings.

Read your statement aloud. Listen to the way the sounds and rhythms seem to invite pauses. Notice places where you’d like the sound or rhythm to be different. Experiment with sounding out the beats of words that seem to be missing until they come to mind. Do this several times until you have a sense of the musical potential of your statement. As you read your statement, some phrases will ring true and others false. Think about the ones that aren’t on the mark and find the true statement lurking behind the false one. You may find that the truth is a simpler statement than the one you made. Or your internal censors may have kept you from making a wholehearted statement of your truth lest it sound self-important. Risk puffing yourself up as long as your claims are in line with your goals and values.

By now your taste buds are saturated. You need a second opinion. Choose a trusted friend or professional to read your statement. Make it clear that you are satisfied with the ingredients on the whole, but you’d like an opinion as to seasoning. You alone are the authority for what is true about your work, but you’d like feedback on clarity, tone, and such technical matters as spelling and punctuation.

Step Five: Summon the Guests.

There’s little point in concocting a fabulous stew if you don’t invite anyone to dinner. Every time you use your artist’s statement you extend your circle of influence and build new branches of the support network for making, showing and selling your work. Enclose a copy of your artist’s statement whenever you send a press release, letter of interest to a gallery or store, or contact a collector. Send it to show promoters and curators. Enclose a copy with shipments of your work so it can be displayed wherever your work is exhibited.

Step Six: File Your Recipe!

Save all the notes and drafts that you’ve made. You’ll want to revise and update your artist’s statement from time to time to reflect changes in your work.

© 2006 Molly Gordon. All rights reserved.

About the Author
Molly Gordon, MCC, is an internationally recognized business coach helping small business owners, independent professionals and artists to do business in a way that feeds their souls as well as their bank accounts. At www.authenticpromotion.com you can join 12,000 readers of Molly’s Authentic Promotion® ezine, and receive a free 31-page guide on effective self promotion.